CLEX, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes

The Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) is an international research consortium of five Australian universities and a network of outstanding national and international partner organizations supported by the Australian Research Council.

Climate extremes are the confluence of high impact weather and climate variability. The Centre will improve our understanding of the processes that trigger or enhance extremes and build this understanding into our modelling systems. The improved predictions of climate extremes will help Australia cope with extremes now and in the future.

Breaking news

Research brief: Warm Atlantic Water explains sea ice melt north of Svalbard

Picture: Sea ice, Jökulsárlón, Iceland. Credit: Davide Cantelli (Unsplash). Northwest of Svalbard, north of Norway, an area known as Whalers Bay stays ice‐free in winter...

Research brief: The biogeochemical structure of Southern Ocean mesoscale eddies.

Picture: Phytoplankton-rich waters off of Argentina. Credit: Norman Kuring, NASA’s Ocean Color Group, using VIIRS data from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership...

How climate change impacts prescribed burning days

Picture (above): Fire in the forest. Credit: Deep Rajwar (Pexels) As the Bushfire Royal Commission investigates the deadly “Black Summer” and how it could have been prevented,...

Need for prediction of marine heatwaves

Picture (above): Wave in sunlight. Credit: Hernan Pauccara An international research team that includes researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes and the...

Research briefs

Research brief: Selecting the correct model is more than a “beauty contest”

The perspective discusses where the community is headed (or needs to head) on the evaluation and use of climate models.   The problem has always been that although many...

Research brief: Tropical atmosphere’s balancing act breaks down at regional levels

Globally the cooling of the atmosphere by radiation is balanced by its heating from condensation and heat transfer from the Earth's surface. This study is the first to...

Research brief: Wind reversals have same surface impacts as sudden stratospheric warming events

Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are events in the upper atmosphere where the usually strong eastward winds over the winter pole suddenly slow down and even reverse...

Research brief: Drought not an automatic result of climate change

New research in Nature Climate Change suggests droughts may not increase as a result of climate change. This finding resulted from researchers investigating an apparent climate...

CLEX Research programs

Extreme rainfall

Drought

Heatwaves and cold air outbreaks

Climate variability and teleconnections