CLEX, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes

The Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) is a major initiative funded by the Australian Research Council. The Centre is an international research consortium of five Australian universities and a network of outstanding national and international partner organizations.

The Centre will improve our understanding of the processes that trigger or enhance extremes and build this understanding into our modelling systems. The improved predictions of climate extremes will enable improvements in how Australia copes with extremes now and in the future.

Breaking news

The six stages of a null result

by Kim Reid I thought I had a rad hypothesis. It was neat, simple and, if proven, would seal the narrative of the paper I was writing. I spent the next two days downloading and...

Briefing note 005: Heatwaves in the ocean threaten marine ecosystems across the world

A joint ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes and NESP Earth Systems and Climate Change Hub briefing note Key Points Marine heatwaves are becoming longer and more...

Research brief: Which species matter most for marine ecosystems to survive climate change?

Human-induced climate change is affecting ecosystems in many different ways. In the ocean, these changes include warming, habitat destruction, fishing, nutrient inputs and...

Research brief: New understanding reveals how jets and cyclones interact

Polar jet streams are huge rivers of air flowing from west to east at 10km height with a maximum speed of around 150 km/h. The jet streams carry with them the ‘weather’ (that is,...

Research briefs

Research brief: How to select the best models to predict future warming

Climate models predict increases in the temperature of hot extremes throughout the 21st century, but there is large uncertainty regarding the amount of warming between different...

Research brief: Global warming to transform Australia’s temperate marine ecosystems

Deep ocean reefs are likely to transform with global warming bringing together species from temperate and tropical waters that may have never coexisted before. This was the...

Research brief: Which species matter most for marine ecosystems to survive climate change?

Human-induced climate change is affecting ecosystems in many different ways. In the ocean, these changes include warming, habitat destruction, fishing, nutrient inputs and...

How climate models work

CLEX Chief Investigator Prof Christian Jakob at a recent Monash University STEM talk takes his audience ​into the world of climate models. It's a talk that...

CLEX Research programs

Extreme rainfall

Drought

Heatwaves and cold air outbreaks

Climate variability and teleconnections